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The Facts

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The anti-siphoning list is a list of major sporting events that the Parliament of Australia has decided must be available for all Australians to see free of charge and cannot be “siphoned” off to pay TV where people are forced to pay to see them.


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The current anti-siphoning list came into effect in 2006 and expires 31 December, 2010. The Minister for Communications can add or remove events from the list at his discretion. 


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There are currently ten sports on the anti-siphoning list plus the Olympic and Commonwealth Games. The sports include football, cricket, tennis, motor sports and golf. Click here to see if your favourite sport is at risk. 


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Events on the anti-siphoning list are delisted 12 weeks before they start to ensure pay TV broadcasters have reasonable access to listed events, if free-to-air broadcasters decide not to purchase the broadcast rights for a particular event. 


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Monitoring by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has found no abuse of the anti-siphoning scheme.


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Any rights to listed sporting events that are not acquired by free-to-air broadcasters are available to pay TV.


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For multi-round events where it is simply not possible for free-to-air networks to broadcast all matches within the event (eg the Australian Open) complementary coverage is available on pay television.


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Over 1600 hours of listed sport was shown on free-to-air television last year.


•    The Federal Government is obliged by legislation to conduct a review of the anti-siphoning list. To view a copy of the Government's "Sport on Television" discussion paper click here.  Please note, submissions for this review have now closed.

•    The current anti-siphoning list restricts showing listed sports on the broadcaster's main channel. Free-to-air broadcasters believe the policy should be updated to accommodate free-to-view digital channels to allow more sport to be shown for free on television.